Melissa Melero

Location
PO Box 5894
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502
Tribe
Northern Paiute
Contact information
melerom@hotmail.com
505.466.3033

 

 

 

 

 


Description of artwork
Mixed media abstract paintings on canvas inspired by Nevada landscape and Paiute culture.

Biography
Melissa Melero was born in San Francisco, CA in 1974 and spent most of her childhood living near Reno, Nevada. She is a Northern Paiute enrolled with the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe located in Fallon, Nevada. Melissa grew up surrounded by artisans in her family from painters to beadwork artists and was inspired by all mediums. While taking photography at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM in the early 90’s, she was motivated to explore many different mediums such as painting, sculpture, and jewelry. After leaving school she focused on painting and experimented with mixed media incorporating her photography and an array of mediums like oil pastels and watercolors. Her work closely integrates nature, culture, and personal experience with the images of the circle, the four directions, and petroglyphs from her tribal areas in Nevada. Her style consisted mostly of figurative and narrative qualities, and slowly transformed to the abstract images of present. The transformation of Melero’s style emerged over time while being known by her peers as an alchemist of mediums. Her work at present reflects highly textured and brightly colored abstract images inspired by her culture, her family, and personal and significant events in her life.

Melissa currently lives with her son in Reno, NV, working as a professional artist and exhibits at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, NM and in select galleries throughout the U.S. Her current influences are imagery found in the Nevada landscape, petroglyphs, beadwork, and basketry from the Native tribes of Nevada and California. “I have the constant desire to create these images in my head and in the process these works mesh into organic, caught in time objects of history and personal development.”

Gallery